Authentic questions

 

I’m on my jollies in Greece at the moment, but keep thinking back to my lovely summer stint at Stafford House and these guys…

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One lesson, they became curious about my family, specifically my brother. Non grammatical questions came tumbling out like:
‘Where live your brother?’
‘He have wife?’
‘What he job?’

My reply was ‘OK guys, I’ll tell you, but first you make correct questions’. In pairs I got them to write them out, reminding them of the QASI syntax rule for present simple and inversion of subject and ‘has’ for ‘has got’, which we’d just studied.

After a while, we had a list of things to ask my unsuspecting brother, because now came the surprise. I got out my phone and recorded this message to my bro on WhatsApp: ‘Hi Ryan. My students want to ask you a few things.’

I had a few looks of shock at this point, so I reassured them they’d only ask one or two questions each and they’d have time to rehearse them first. I reminded them they’d be transforming them into the second person ‘you’, since they’d be talking to him directly.

The result was intense concentration on getting the pronunciation and form right. It was also a way to deal with their not-so-sneaky Whatsapp use during lessons. If you can’t beat them join them!

Unfortunately poor Ryan was at work and didn’t have time to even listen to the 20 odd voice messages we sent him, nevermind actually answer them! So in the end I did it on his behalf.

Shame… because I was curious to hear his answer to this one: “Is your sister a little bit crazy??”

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Author: Lindsey Clark

Currently following an MA programme in Applied Linguistics at Durham University, previously I was teaching in Italy (9 years) and the UK, next stop will be Greece. I'm a Cambridge speaking and writing examiner, a conference speaker, occasional teacher of Italian, aspiring author and always working hard at cultivating my own multilingualism. I'm particularly interested in student-centred approaches to preparing students for EFL exams. Other stuff I'm into: how English is really used by 'native' speakers (check out my Twitter account @ClarkLinz), using translation and L1, the Flipped Classroom, the Lexical Approach, and the usefulness and pitfalls of self-assessment.

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